Resignation

I resigned one of my two part time jobs on Friday, and it feels like a mountain gorilla has leapt from my back.

I hate the job.  It is the right kind of organisation but my role within that organisation was like pulling teeth.  Things became slowly more difficult the longer I stayed: four managers in the space of a year, and trying to squash a full time job into two days per week.  People who have worked part time will know that you can wear out your lips letting everyone know you’re part time, and although a deadline might feel five days away to them for you it’s only a half day away because you’re leaving now and won’t be back in until half way through next week.  People who work part time generally don’t have time to chat at the water-cooler or to take a piss, or a lunch break, because they are too busy trying to meet the expectations of the managers who all work full time.

Technically, I resigned back in July, but I’ve been staying on two days per week to bridge the gap until my replacement could be recruited.   I was told that I could not take any annual leave but instead I’d need to allow it to accumulate and then get paid out when I finally finished up.  This situation is OK if you’re working a few extra weeks but we’re into month four of foot-dragging apathy about running a recruitment process.  Not to mention that there have been significant union-management disputes and I’m a union rep, which adds work and stress.

It came to the point where the only tick-box in the column of reasons to keep the job was money.  We had a summer of expensive commitments but that’s finished now, and we can live with me having only one part-time job at least for a while.  And I adore my research role.  Opportunities are arising there for which I need to be available.  I can’t be available if I’m dragging myself to South London two days per week to work at a job I’m only doing for the money.

A little bit of frost tingles up my spine when I think about giving up paid employment in the current job market.  I’m usually a very structured person, but I’m going to keep on trucking and see what happens.  For once, I’m trying to wing it and relax about it.

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4 Responses to “Resignation”


  1. 1 unmitigated me (m.a.w.) November 7, 2010 at 5:55 pm

    I’m always amazed when decisions like this turn out for the best. Think of the money you’ll be saving by NOT working that job, not to mention the stress you’ll be leaving behind.

  2. 2 Jen on the Edge November 7, 2010 at 7:57 pm

    I left my job a few months ago after four years of unbelievable stress. I left the job without having a new one lined up. Yes, being unemployed is a little stressful, but otherwise, I am so incredibly relaxed and happy now that my husband would probably be fine if I didn’t find a new job, except that the extra money is helpful.

    So, congrats on leaving a job that was causing you angst and stress!

  3. 3 Naomi B. November 8, 2010 at 1:01 pm

    Congratulations on getting out before your soul was sucked out of you completely. It is awesome that you are already in a situation where you are doing what you love.


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